The Best Places to See Sakura in Sendai

FEBRUARY 7, 2024
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The Best Places to See Sakura in Sendai

So it’s springtime and you’re looking for a spot to do hanami (flower viewing) for sakura season in Sendai. Unfortunately, you don’t know where are the best spots. Worry not, I’ve put together a list to help you with that. Let’s dive in!

Note: photos in this article were taken with either a digital camera or a film camera.

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Oomachi Nishi Park

Let’s start with the so-called ‘go-to’ location to see the beautiful sakura in Sendai: Oomachi Nishi-kouen. Literally means ‘West Park’, this is where the big outdoor events like Jozenji Street Jazz Festival are usually held.

Everybody knows this park in Sendai and because of that, viewing sakura there feels like going to a festival. Go here if you prefer a rather lively ambiance.

Pros:

  • Easy access by subway (right next to Subway Tozai Line, Omachi Nishi-koen Station)
  • A lot of options for food and drink

Cons:

  • Can be too crowded and loud at times

Nishikicho Park

Moving on, Nishikicho Park is a park located not so far from (locally) famous Kotodai Park right in the heart of Sendai. This park is conveniently located near tourist attractions and landmarks, so you can go straight for meals or shopping in the nearby arcade afterward. If you don’t have much time to spend in Sendai I would recommend this spot.

Pros:

  • Convenient location in the city center (5 minutes walk from Subway Nanboku Line, Kotodai-koen Station)

Cons:

  • Guaranteed to be crowded

Tsutsujigaoka Park

Tsutsujigaoka Park, my favorite park, is located on the east side of Sendai. I might have a slight bias towards Tsutsujigaoka Park just because I lived in its vicinity before and thus visited the park a lot. Similarly, this place is good to visit if you only have a short time to walk around in Sendai.

Pros:

  • Easy access (15 minutes walking distance from Sendai station)
  • Most likely there will be food stalls

Cons:

  • Nothing in my opinion

Mikamine Park

Going a bit further south from downtown Sendai into Nagamachi area, you will find this beautiful, secluded park. Its location might not be its best feature, but what it’s lacking in convenience, it compensates with a fantastic view. The location is on hilly terrain, and because of it gives a pretty view into the city.

To go here via public transport, you need to ride Sendai Subway Nanboku Line and alight at Nagamachi-Minami station. From there you need to walk around 20 minutes to reach the park.

Pros:

  • Beautiful view and a great walking experience
  • Fewer people go here
  • Most likely there will be food stalls

Cons:

  • Might be quite hard to reach via public transport

Nanakita Park

Located not far from the northside terminal of Sendai Subway Nanboku Line in Izumi-chuo Station, you can find one of Sendai’s largest parks Nanakita Park. Although it is more known as the place to visit during summer (for its summer festival) and winter (for its winter illumination/light-ups), Nanakita Park is a great alternative to see sakura in Sendai.

Pros:

  • By far the biggest park in terms of size and thus there is plenty to see
  • Good eating option (as of now, there are 2 cafes inside the park)

Cons:

  • A limited selection of sakura trees

Shintera

Technically, Shintera is an area located south of Sendai Station, along with its aptly named main road called Shintera-dori (Shintera Avenue). Here, you can find a collection of temples dotted along the road, each with its own flavor and sakura trees.

As a photographer, this is the location where I feel at ease the most. I recommend visiting this place if you prefer a nice, quiet walk throughout the neighborhood while viewing the blooming sakura to a chatty hanami.

Pros:

  • Plenty of beautiful temples with sakura trees
  • Fewer people go here
  • 15 minutes walking distance from Sendai station

Cons:

  • Not a place to have the typical sakura-viewing party (hanami)

Kita-Sendai

Though Rinnoji Temple is a well-known tourist destination in Sendai, in contrast, the area near the temple, Kita-Sendai, is relatively unknown. But you might be wrong to think that there’s nothing there.

Just like Shintera, Kita-Sendai boasts a collection of temples and shrines scattered around the area, including the famous Rinnoji Temple and Aoba Shrine. To get there, you can ride Sendai Subway Nanboku Line and alight at Kita-Sendai Station. You might need to walk to see everything it has to offer, but I promise you it will be worth your time.

Pros:

  • Can be a rather refreshing walk with various sakura spots to check

Cons:

  • Conversely, need to walk a bit to see all the sights

Matsumori Castle Ruins

The last location in the list is what I would call a hidden gem. It’s located deep in the Izumi Ward in the northern part of Sendai. To get here, it’s best to go by car. There’s a bus servicing the area, but since it’s rather rural the bus schedule is not convenient.

That being said, you will be rewarded with a beautiful view upon reaching the castle ruins. The last time I went there there were only a handful of people, proving that this place is abysmally underrated.

Pros:

  • The view is magnificent

Cons:

  • Difficult access, only accessible by car (or bus if you have saint-like patience)

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About the Author

Jerfareza Daviano | Photographer in Sendai, Japan
Jerfareza Daviano

Jerfareza is a freelance photographer from Indonesia currently based in Sendai, Japan, offering wide range of photography service especially profile portraits, couple or family photos, and wedding photography. Should you wish to hire him you can check here for more details.

Visit his website for articles about travel in Japan especially Tohoku area and interesting bits about photography.

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